Anime Review: Tsuki ga Kirei (Part 2)

Standard

What makes a good, healthy relationship? Common interests. Financial stability. Spending time together. Trust in your partner. Emotional support. Affirming affection.

These are things that we know work, because that’s how couples normally would have kindled their relationships. But these are advice given by those who have had plenty of experience with relationships, romantic or otherwise. But for the young, it can be difficult to understand how these work, frankly because they never tried. Or at least… I never tried.
I adore this anime original, regardless of how overly sappy it is. But as you have probably guessed by the header for this post, I don’t have one opinion on this series; I have two. If you would like to read my first opinion that’s more performative and less analytical, click here. Choose to believe whichever one you like better, but I think there’s value in both of them.

Okay, enough tooting my own horn, let’s break it down!

Continue reading

Anime Review: Tsukigakirei

Standard

To myself: the “True” Lystria.

Maybe no one else knows what your review schedule looks like, but I do. You have the recent romantic hit, Tsukigakirei (As the Moon, so Beautiful) slated for Tuesday. You were going to gush on and on, about why this anime is so important to the romance genre, and why it has relevance to today’s understanding of young love. How it’s a masterpiece, worthy enough to be considered in your running for Anime of the Year.

You may have adored this series, but you and I both know that there was something you hated about it, too! Something you never wanted to say, because it would reveal the very flaws of your criticism, the weaknesses in your true, likable self. Well I’m here to tell the other side of your review, before you get a chance to say anything about it!

After all, if you say what you wanted to say, you will never get to talking about Her!

Continue reading

My First Philosophical Experience

Standard

This is my second official entry of a new series of posts that I will be doing on this blog. In case you missed it, my first post in this series was a critique on Descartes’ Cogito, because I wanted to start with something that many philosophers are familiar with. From here on out, these philosophical editorials will be free write exercises, with varying formats as I go along.

If you have read several of my anime reviews, you would know that philosophy plays a huge role in how I critique some of the shows I watch. And if you’re wondering why I haven’t posted anything about my first anime experience which makes up a majority of the content on this site, let’s just say that those origins are more cliché. That is, my friends got me into that hobby, and I’ve loved it ever since.

So where did I begin on this crazy journey? Well it was nothing like a Cartesian experience, that’s for sure. But it was one that I think a lot of philosophers start with: by questioning what is often thought to be undeniably true.

Continue reading

Anime Review: Hi-sCool! Seha Girls

Standard

Before I get into this review, I have one disclaimer: I never grew up with Sega. I’ve done as much research as I could about what this series has to offer, but to Sega fans out there, please excuse my naiveté.

Regardless, it is fun to watch. Truth be told, Sega is still making games, but this anime is based on the light novel series, Sega Hard Girls, which imagines all of Sega’s consoles anthropomorphized as girls. Sega Hard Girls would later become part of a crossover with Superdimension Neptune, but never mind that. This is an anime review!

So with that, grab your controllers, bring some extra change with you, or download those mobile apps. For this review, we will be revisiting Sega’s library of games with the Sega Hard Girls (and their chibi counterparts) as they take on one last task: to graduate high school!

Continue reading

Problems Posed by Descartes — The Cogito

Standard

Hello, my fellow readers!

This is the first official post to a weekly blog series I’m doing on philosophical editorials. I don’t have a title for the series yet, but once I do, each post will be tagged as such! In case you weren’t aware, I love philosophy, and I have a BA in the discipline. My friends might tell you that I went through the program like a grad student, to the extent that I had bounced around ideas with them for their compositions and theses. I guess…

To kick off this series, I have chosen to critique one of the most recognizable names in philosophy: Rene Descartes. Why him? Because if you’re ever planning to teach philosophy to your kids (which studies show is a smart choice), Descartes is about as basic as you can get for elementary school students to understand (which I admittedly just made up). And apparently, I took one of those online quiz things recently, revealing that I think most like Descartes, for some reason.

Today we will be discussing one of the most common topics that you will find in just about any Introduction to Philosophy course: Descartes’  Cogito. This argument can be found in the first 2 sections of his Meditations on First Philosophy, so if you want to follow along, click here.

DISCLAIMER: this is a blog post, and is therefore not meant for academic purposes. Things will be paraphrased or simply me talking out of my ass about ideas posed in philosophy that merely sound “smart.” Cite at your own risk.

Continue reading